viewsonic elite xg270qc review

Some transitions provide more noticeable overshoot than shown here, as we explore in the context of Adaptive-Sync at relatively low refresh rates later on. The consistency here was as good as we’ve seen outside of IPS in the LCD world, though. Games very nicely. The ViewSonic supports a variable refresh rate range of 52 – 165Hz*. We observed faint striations and minor patchiness in some regions of the screen. As usual for an Adaptive-Sync model, variable overdrive isn’t used – so the overdrive doesn’t automatically re-tune and slacken off appropriately for reduced refresh rates. Some subtle differences may be noticed during careful side by side comparison of very specific content, but things are really handled very well even if GPU dithering is used. To configure VSync, open ‘AMD Radeon Software’. There were some fairly eye-catching vibrant reds and oranges, with flames and certain painted elements and in-game markers standing out in quite a vivid way. The ‘Fast’ and ‘Faster’ settings were excluded from this analysis for simplicity, as there was just a very gentle progression rather than distinct differences between the settings. Reviewed in the United States on April 2, 2019. The green block appeared a saturated green chartreuse shade throughout, more yellow towards the bottom. The combination of 2560 x 1440 (WQHD) resolution and 27” screen size is a popular one. That’s quite a different look to the universally high brightness that was delivered here. It certainly has some utility, but most users will find the normal flicker-free operation of the monitor more practical. The shifts are more pronounced if sitting closer to the screen. The ‘Full’ setting uses an interpolation process to ensure all pixels are used to display the image. The monitor generally presents these shades in a slightly more vivid and saturated way than intended, mainly due to the colour gamut extending some way beyond sRGB. The faded red shifted alongside head movement and is more pronounced from a normal viewing position (with a pinkish hue) if sitting closer to the screen. Such digital boosts just pull things closer to the edge of the gamut without expanding the gamut itself, crushing things together and negatively impacting shade variety. We refer to these as ‘interlace pattern artifacts’ but some users refer to them as ‘inversion artifacts’ and others as ‘scan lines’. The combination of 2560 x 1440 (WQHD) resolution and 27” screen size is a popular one. This will coincide with the frame rate if the display is within the VRR range. The fragments appear as distinct repetitions of the object for the dark and medium backgrounds are due to the pixel responses not keeping up with the rigorous demands of the refresh cycle. A sharpness filter is applied, which is not extreme and designed to slightly accentuate the improved tone mapping capabilities and (doesn’t apply here) enhanced contrast under HDR. These bright elements stood out well against their darker surroundings. That’s the sort of thing that’s needed for bright elements to really ‘pop’ and give a distinct contrast-rich HDR appearance. Whether it’s worth paying more for the extra features of the ViewSonic is open for debate, but some will find the overall package and feature set of the XG270QC very attractive. In addition, the monitor frame is relatively thin on the upper side and on the sides and merges directly into the display. The monitor provided a fairly vibrant look to things on Battlefield V. With the colour gamut extending beyond sRGB there was an extra dollop of vibrancy. At 60Hz we measured a slightly higher but still respectable 7.35ms. We made similar observations on Shadow of the Tomb Raider. There was also some overshoot in places, such as some ‘halo’ trailing, but this was not overly bright or strong overshoot. The monitor provided a good palette of shades, including some fairly eye-catching neon reds, pinks and cyans. The size is somewhat more enveloping and immersive than smaller screens, but it’s usually something that can be adapted to quite readily. This was highly reactive and helped bring decent atmosphere to predominantly darks scenes, whilst brighter elements in brighter scenes had good ‘pop’. The image below shows one of our favourite scenes for showcasing a decent HDR performance, from Shadow of the Tomb Raider. ViewSonic ELITE XG270QC Curved 27” 1ms 1440p 165Hz FreeSync Premium... ViewSonic ELITE XG270QC Curved 27” 1ms 1440p 165Hz FreeSync Premium Pro Gaming Monitor with VESA DisplayHDR 400 and Advanced Ergonomics for Esports, Black. This model employs a light matte anti-glare screen surface with reasonably light surface texture. This is a useful setting if you’re an AMD user and wish to gain closer tracking of the sRGB gamut without profiling, including in applications that aren’t colour-managed. When viewing SDR content with HDR active in Windows things appear generally bright and over-sharpened with some noticeable undersaturation. The ‘Fastest’ setting again appears optimal. The luminance uniformity was variable. Here, it provides a comfortable pixel density which is quite high but not extreme. The ‘Fastest’ setting on the ViewSonic is quite comparable to this AOC reference and we consider this to be the optimal setting at 144Hz. It was mainly for the light to medium shades described earlier and wasn’t something we found particularly eye-catching. Both our responsiveness article and the G-SYNC article linked to explore the importance of these two elements being synchronised. As usual for an Adaptive-Sync model, variable overdrive isn’t used – so the overdrive doesn’t automatically re-tune and slacken off appropriately for reduced refresh rates. Fortunately, the ViewSonic offers reasonable DCI-P3 coverage, which as noted earlier is the near-term target for HDR that developers have in mind. The pinkish hue shifted alongside head movement. Results here were strong, with no significant deviations recorded. There are custom game modes for popular genres like FPS and MOBA, a Blue Light Filter mode, an OverClocking option, a Hertz Limiter, and 6 different response time modes. Photos and videos tends to exaggerate the curve and give a very poor idea of the viewing experience when you’re sitting in front of the monitor using it. A slight bump up again, nothing dramatic. Lagom contrast tests And somewhat lower than on certain other VA models we’ve observed, including the Samsung C27HG70. The speaker grills and connection ports are located at the back and there’s a joystick between the RGB lights at the bottom to navigate the menus. When using PureXP or a similar strobe backlight feature, it’s important that the frame rate of the monitor matches the refresh rate of the display. The monitor also offers basic HDR support, responding to HDR10 content with VESA DisplayHDR 400 certification. This improves the ‘connected feel’, which describes the precision and fluidity that’s felt when interaction with the game world. The pursuit photographs below show how things looked with refresh rate doubled, to 120Hz. Unfortunately, we didn’t have access to a newer GPU (RTX 20 or RTX 30 series) at time of review to confirm if they behave similarly. Obvious to us, at least, and users sensitive to such things – sensitivity does vary. These settings only apply to SDR, HDR has separate settings associated with it (is far more restrictive) and is explored in the relevant section of the review. The reference shots don’t show this behaviour and instead show some overshoot. That means that if the game is running between 52fps and 165fps, the monitor will adjust its refresh rate to match. But this difference is nowhere near as pronounced as the TN example in the panels type article. The letters ‘PCM’ are typed out to help highlight any potential text rendering issues related to unusual subpixel structure, whilst the white space more clearly shows the actual subpixel layout alongside a rough indication of screen surface. Whether it’s worth paying more for the extra features of the ViewSonic is open for debate, but some will find the overall package and feature set of the XG270QC very attractive. This was more pronounced at lower refresh rates, but even at 165Hz we could notice it in places. So not majorly affecting perceived blur for those transitions. This configures it globally, but if you wish to configure it for individual games click ‘Game Graphics’ towards the top right. The ‘Full’ setting uses an interpolation process to ensure all pixels are used to display the image. The ‘1:1’ setting is a pixel mapping mode that will only use the pixels called for in the source resolution, presenting an undistorted and unscaled image with black borders around. It was mainly for the light to medium shades described earlier and wasn’t something we found particularly eye-catching. A higher setting means a shorter pulse width, decreasing brightness whilst potentially enhancing clarity. If there are mismatches between the two, there is very obvious juddering or stuttering which stands out very clearly as there’s very little perceived blur due to eye movement to mask it. Perceived blur (pursuit photography) This is an alternative to VSync which allows the frame rate to rise above the refresh rate (no VSync latency penalty) whilst potentially keeping the experience free from tearing or juddering. Although our testing here is focused on HDR PC gaming using DisplayPort, we made similar observations when viewing HDR video content on the Windows 10 Netflix app. This may not occur with newer GPUs; we admit our GTX10 Series GPU is rather dated now, but didn’t have access to anything newer at time of review. The image below shows one of our favourite scenes for showcasing a decent HDR performance, from Shadow of the Tomb Raider. The 165Hz refresh rate was put to quite good use here. If you have no intention of using this monitors Motion Blur Reduction (PureXP) then this review should be of no concern to you. Although its specifications are quite decent, you will get a 165Hz refresh rate and AMD FreeSync Premium Pro with the price of just around $500. We had to lower things just a touch more for our preferred brightness setting using the ‘Blue Light Filter’. The section of video review below runs through the response performance of the monitor and includes some examples of the weaknesses discussed here. The setting is listed as ‘Wait for Vertical Refresh’. HDR (High Dynamic Range) That was certainly observed on Battlefield V, with some transitions affected a lot more noticeably than others. Our RX 580 is far from a powerhouse of a GPU, so maintaining a solid 165fps is very tricky even with heavily reduced graphics settings. With a slightly ‘sandy’ quality to them from the screen surface, which many users wouldn’t really notice. The ViewSonic XG270QC, of the ELITE series, takes the VA route with an emphasis on contrast. I have always loved IPS vs. TN for it's color accuracy and deep blacks but I wanted nothing less than 240hz refresh and that was not an option I had found from a brand I trusted. In particular, things were overly sharp, somewhat cool-tinted, oversaturated in a bad way (i.e. Now we have the CQ27G2U reference back in the mix to compare with. This is reduced or eliminated by reducing the overdrive setting, without a huge impact on the overall experience elsewhere at these relatively low refresh rates. As you might expect the slight bump up in refresh rate to 144Hz doesn’t make dramatic differences. It’s easy to get put off curved monitors if you haven’t sat down at a desk and used one for a while. The XG270QG again shows its strength in terms of pixel responsiveness, with just a few whiffs of powdery trailing. With the ~3000:1 static contrast, we wouldn’t call the darkest shades ‘deep and inky’, especially if viewed in a dimly lit room. Using the ‘Normal’ setting gives good distinction for the white notches and slightly enhanced distinction for the segments – they’re actually more visible in practice than in the photos as well.

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